Category: autonomous

AI and Automotive: Where we’re at

In the next 10 years, some form of artificial intelligence will be installed in 100 percent of new cars, according to IHS Markit.

This article describes current use cases for AI as well as the hurdles still to be overcome. One interesting idea from Luca DeAmbroggi of IHS is that there might be some kind of external certification process for an automotive AI — like a driver’s license.

AI: The Next Step in Smart Automotive

AI: The Next Smart Step for Automotive

Artificial intelligence is a key enabling technology for self-driving and semi-autonomous cars. This report examines the areas where machine learning, deep learning and big data already are deployed, and what the next steps are.

Read it on the Tu-Auto site.

 

Driverless cars — if they make them, who will buy?

The auto industry is firmly behind autonomous cars, and so is the U.S. government. But despite a lot of hoo-hah in the press, consumer interest is low.

Kelley Blue Book’s Future Autonomous Vehicle Driver Study surveyed 2,264 consumers aged 12 to 64 and found a strong disconnect between those of us in the auto-tech bubble and real-world folks.

This interview with  Karl Brauer, executive publisher of Autotrader and Kelley Blue Book, goes over the findings. Bottom line: Consumer education needs to be better.

What If No-One Wants a Driverless Car?

Why Autonomous Cars Will Skip Level 3

It’s becoming clear that level 3 #autonomous driving won’t be much fun — or very safe. Drivers will be expected to pay attention and stay ready to take control in an emergency, so what’s the point?

Experts explain why we’ll see a mix of truly autonomous vehicles and more advanced driver safety features instead of what has been proposed as the third level.

Driverless Vehicles Will Continue to Dominate Auto Headlines

How Connectivity Will Improve Autonomous Driving

Evidently, whether self-driving cars will need to be connected to external databases, maps or whatever is a matter of contention. I always thought they would, to access real-time maps, traffic and road info, etc. In the world of research, however, “autonomous” means the vehicle has no need to connect to any external systems. This article examines how real-world autonomous cars will make use of their persistent connections.

Autonomous and Connected: Better Together

I think I deserve props for not using that Reese’s P-butter Cups analogy. : )

Next-gen sensors for autonomous cars

There are three strategies for implementing advanced safety features that will lead to full autonomy: add still more sensors; reduce the number of sensors by combining functions; use advanced processing to make use of sensor data.

Here’s a look at how vendors and tier 1s are doing all of them.

Sensors: Powerful, Cheap and Multipurpose